ICA Logo ICA Regional Conference 2022

Computational Communication Research

in Central and Eastern Europe

Helsinki, Finland
June 27-29, 2022

Abstract submission is closed

COVID-19 and relocation note
The conference will be held in a mixed online-offline format, with the majority of participants coming in person. The conference has been relocated from Russia to Finland and debranded from Higher School of Economics. Neither it nor any other Russian institution is participating in either adminstrating or funding of this event.

ICA Logo ICA Regional Conference 2022

Computational Communication Research

in Central and Eastern Europe

Helsinki, Finland
June 27-29, 2022

Abstract submission is closed

COVID-19 and relocation note
The conference will be held in a mixed online-offline format, with the majority of participants coming in person. The conference has been relocated from Russia to Finland and debranded from Higher School of Economics. Neither it nor any other Russian institution is participating in either adminstrating or funding of this event.

ICA logo ICA Regional Conference 2022

Computational Communication Research

in Central and Eastern Europe

Helsinki, Finland
June 27-29, 2022

Abstract submission is closed

Call for Papers
COVID-19 and relocation note
The conference will be held in a mixed online-offline format, with the majority of participants coming in person. The conference has been relocated from Russia to Finland and debranded from Higher School of Economics. Neither it nor any other Russian institution is participating in either adminstrating or funding of this event.
EasyChair logo

Timeline

January 28, 2022
Deadline for abstracts submission
February 25, 2022
Acceptance/rejection decisions communicated to the submitters
March 15, 2022
Online registration opens, final decision on the conference format communicated to participants
May 30, 2022
Online registration closes
Early June, 2022
Deadline for submission of full papers for CCR special issue
June 27-29, 2022
Conference dates
December, 2022
CCR special issue publication
Dear participants

We are very excited to have the ICA Regional Conference 2022 "Computational Communication Research in Central and Eastern Europe" in Helsinki. As we prepare for our upcoming meeting, we would like to know more about your attendance. Please fill out this form to let us know if you are attending online/in person, require a visa for travel, or have any special needs: www.lyyti.in/ICA_Regional_Conference_2022_6031.

We want to remind you that participants who present a paper have to register by the 10th of May 2022. Remote participants who are not presenting in the conference can register for the conference by filling in the online registration form by June 20 to join the virtual audience.

For any other special inquiry not mentioned in the registration form, please contact us at ica2022compcomm@gmail.com .

About

Welcome

ICA regional conference on Computational Communication Research in Central and Eastern Europe will take place in Helsinki, Finland, on June 27-29, 2022. We welcome scholars of computational communication regardless of what region they come from. The goal of the conference is to consolidate the Central and Eastern European community of computational communication scholars and contribute to its closer integration with the global community, both within and beyond current ICA membership.

Scope

The scope of the conference is intentionally broad as we look to attract participants from beyond the region and cover most of the subject areas represented in ICA divisions. The conference will welcome research focused on, but not limited to the following research areas:

  • Diffusion, perception, and effects of information and misinformation (including political and COVID-related information)
  • The structure and dynamics of online communities
  • Team formation, structure, and efficiency
  • Formation, maintenance, and decay of individual social ties
  • Text communication and human processing of textual information
  • Effects of COVID-related digital turn in education on instructional communication
  • Assessing and improving health conditions via wearable devices, digital traces, and online interventions
  • Political mobilization, deliberation, and polarization online
  • Cultural production and communication in creative industries
  • Communication and vulnerable groups: Hate speech, online, discrimination, cyber-bullying
  • Detection of algorithmic biases hindering inclusion, equity and equal access to public goods
  • Designing communication systems and environments to improve societies
  • Communication in Central and Eastern European societies

We encourage submissions of papers employing a wide range of computational approaches and representing interdisciplinary fields such as: Network science, computer simulation of social processes, computational linguistics, socio- and psycholinguistics, large-scale experimental approaches to human behavior, multi-modal data modeling, communication dynamics and multivariate time series analysis, cultural analytics and visualization, and others.

Please note that we will not accept computational studies unrelated to human communication, those limited solely to computer science, or any communication research that does not employ advanced computation with either big or complexly structured data. Papers co-authored by interdisciplinary teams are especially welcome.

Keynote speakers

Rich Ling
Rich Ling
“The Social and Psychological Dimensions of Confirmation Bias”
Rich Ling is the Shaw Foundation Professor of Media Technology, Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. His work is focused on the social consequences of mobile communication. Ling is a founding co-editor of the Sage journal Mobile Media and Communication. He is the founding editor of The Mobile Communication Research Series (along with Scott Campbell) and an associate editor for The Information Society, The Journal of Computer Mediated Communication as well as Information Technology and International Development.
Markus Strohmaier
Markus Strohmaier
“Inequalities in Social Networks”
Markus Strohmaier is the Professor for Methods and Theories of Computational Social Sciences and Humanities at RWTH Aachen University (Germany), the Scientific Coordinator for Digital Behavioral Data at GESIS — Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences and an External Faculty Member at the Complexity Science Hub Vienna. Strohmaier is also the Editor-in-Chief of EPJ Data-Science. He is interested in applying and developing computational techniques to research challenges on the intersection between computer science and the social sciences / humanities.
Anabel Quan-Haase
Anabel Quan-Haase
“Ethics and Privacy in Computational Social Science: Data access, representativity, and consent”
Dr. Anabel Quan-Haase is a Full Professor of Sociology and Information and Media Studies and Rogers Chair in Studies in Journalism and New Information Technology at Western University. Her research interests focus on social networks, their structure and composition, social capital, social media, and methodological innovations. Dr. Quan-Haase is past chair of the Communication, Information Technology, and Media Sociology section of the American Sociological Association and past president of the Canadian Association for Information Science .
Vladimir Kovalenko
Vladimir Kovalenko
“Analysis of Communication and Collaborative Work in Software Engineering”
Dr. Vladimir Kovalenko leads the Intelligent Collaboration Tools Lab (ICTL) at JetBrains Research in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. His team works on making collaboration tools in software engineering more aware of the processes they support and more helpful. Besides that, Vladimir strives to shrink the gap between research and practice in software engineering by promoting the industrial perspective in the software research community.
Wouter van Atteveldt
Wouter van Atteveldt
“Media effects research in an age of fragmentation and social media”
Prof. Dr. Wouter van Atteveldt is Professor of Computational Communication Science & Political Communication at Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam. He is co-founder of the Computational Methods division of the International Communication Association, and Founding Chief Editor of Computational Communication Research. He has published extensively on innovative methods for analyzing political text and contributed to a number of relevant R and Python packages.

Participate

Submission guidelines

Conference paper abstracts of 400 to 700 words are invited by January 28, 2022. Abstracts must clearly describe the central question of the study, data and methodological approach to their analysis, as well the wider implications of the expected results and their relevance to human communication research. Although it is not mandatory, we encourage submissions that include links to datasets and code used in the analysis.

Fees

All fees have been waived.

Best Paper Award

Authors of selected abstracts will be considered for the Best Paper Award. The decision on the invitation will be made by the program committee and additionally communicated to the authors of the selected abstracts. The best paper will be selected among the manuscripts submitted until June, 25.

Eligibility criteria:

  • At least one of the authors must be an early-career scholar (graduate student or no more than three years from the date of thesis/dissertation defense).
  • This author should also present the paper at the conference.

Best Paper Award Committee:

  • Wouter van Atteveldt, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam & Editor-in-chief of Computational Communication Research, Netherlands;
  • Olessia Koltsova, computational communication researcher, St. Petersburg;
  • Svetlana Bodrunova, computational communication researcher, St. Petersburg;
  • Iliya Kiriya, media researcher, Moscow;
  • Peter Monge, Professor Emeritus of Communication at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, University of Southern California, USA.

Committees

Advisory committee

  • Iwona Hofman, President of Polish Communication Association, Maria Curie-Skłodowska University.
  • János Kertész, Head of the Department of Network and Data Science, Central European University.
  • Gregor Petrič, Head of the Center for Methodology and Informatics at the Faculty of Social Sciences, Ljubljana University.
  • Maximilian Schich, ERA Chair for Cultural Data Analytics, Tallinn University.
  • Vejune Zemaityte, senior fellow, CUDAN Open Lab, Tallinn University.
  • Anastasiya Bonch-Osmolovskaya, computational linguist, Moscow.
  • Ivan Smirnov, computational social scientist, RWTH Aachen University.
  • Iliya Kiriya, media researcher, Moscow.
  • Svetlana Bodrunova, computational communication researcher, St. Petersburg.
  • Nikita Basov, research fellow, Bielefeld University.
  • Wouter van Atteveldt, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam & Editor-in-chief of Computational Communication Research.

Organizing committee

Daria Gritsenko
Daria Gritsenko
Committee Chair
University of Helsinki, Finland
Olessia Koltsova
Olessia Koltsova
Program Chair
Computational communication researcher, St. Petersburg
Elena Artemenko
Elena Artemenko
EasyChair, correspondence
Cognitive neuroscience researcher, St. Petersburg
Francisco Rangel Bustamante
Francisco Rangel Bustamante
Conference assistant
Master's student of Intercultural Encounters, University of Helsinki
Maxim Terpilovskii
Maxim Terpilovskii
Website, design
Computational researcher, St. Petersburg
Victoria Vziatysheva
Victoria Vziatysheva
News, social media
Social media researcher, St. Petersburg

Program

Time (GMT+3) Format Authors Title
JUNE, 27
10:00—10:30 Opening remarks
10:30—11:30 online
KEYNOTE Markus Strohmaier
Inequalities in Social Networks
Panel 1.1 Political communication online
11:30—11:50 in person Svetlana Bodrunova Patterns of cumulative deliberation in online discussions
11:50—12:10 in person Aidar Zinnatullin Online political discussions within oppositional communities on YouTube in the non-democratic context
12:10—12:30 online Anna Shilina and Denis Stukal Trolls in Online Political Communication in Social Media: Roles and Perception
12:30—12:50 online Ernesto de León, Mykola Makhortykh, Aleksandra Urman and Roberto Ulloa Googling the ‘Big Lie’: How search engine algorithms determined exposure of the US 2020 presidential conspiracy
12:50—14:00 Lunch
Panel 1.2. Political communication online
14:00—14:20 online Kinga Adamczewsaka. The role of media in political information flow
14:20—14:40 online Patricia Sánchez-Holgado, David Blanco-Herrero, Javier J. Amores, Cristina Quintana and Carlos Arcila-Calderón Hate Speech as a Predictor of Social Acceptance of Migrants in Europe. Computational and Large-scale Analysis of Geolocated Hateful Tweets
14:40—15:00 online Ilya Philippov Symmetrical Answer: Police Suppression of Protest Episodes as a Driver of Political Communication in Social Media
15:00—15:20 Break
Panel 2.1. Media response to the COVID-19 pandemic
15:20—15:40 in person Daniel Thiele “Don’t believe the media’s pandemic propaganda!!” How Covid-19 affected populist Facebook user comments in seven European countries
15:40—16:00 in person Lambodara Parabhoi, Ajit Kumar Kainchi and Dr Manoj Kumar Verma Sentiment Analysis Covishield, Covaxin and SputnikV Vaccines Use in India
16:00—16:20 in person Dechun Zhang, Chang Zhang and Hsuan Lei Shao Affective biopolitics in the time of crisis: Unpacking Chinese Party press’s soft propaganda during Covid-19
16:20—16:40 in person Siqi Li Research on the Media Consumption of Chinese-People in the UK in the Current Global Media Context
16:40—17:00 Coffee break
Panel 2.2. Media response to the COVID-19 pandemic
17:00—17:20 online Alexandra Bocharova Information Policy of Chinese Media during Political and COVID-related Crises: Comparative Analysis
17:20—17:40 online Lāsma Šķestere and Roberts Dargis The chicken or the egg causality dilemma: who leads the spread of information about COVID-19?
17:40—18:00 online Anqi Shao, Kaiping Chen, Zening Duan and Sijia Yang The Reproductive Dynamics of Moral Appeal Expression on Social Media – Examining Public Discourse of COVID-19 Issues on Twitter
18:00—18:20 online Olga Kamenchuk, Ayse Lokmanoglu and Erik Nisbet Social Amplification of COVID-19 Risk in Russian Social Mediated News 2020-2021
18:20—18:30 Break
18:30—19:30 in person
KEYNOTE Anabel Quan-Haase
Ethics and Privacy in Computational Social Science: Data access, representativity, and consent
JUNE, 28
10:00—11:00 online
KEYNOTE Wouter van Atteveldt
Media effects research in an age of fragmentation and social media
Panel 2.3. Media response to the COVID-19 pandemic
11:00—11:20 online Dmitry Erokhin and Nadejda Komendantova COVID-19 pandemic and conspiracy theories
11:20—11:40 online Jae Eun Chung, Jiang Li, Ikechukwu Anude, Poong Oh and Liu Meirong Understanding public perception and attitudes toward Covid-19 vaccination: Computational Approach through Twitter
11:40—12:00 online Elizaveta Kuznetsova, Mykola Makhortykh, Aleksandra Urman and Roberto Ulloa Why not just give it a shot? How the Russian COVID-19 vaccines are framed by web search engines
12:00—12:20 Coffee break
Panel 3.1. Computational methods
12:20—12:40 in person Tim Robin Strate and Omnia Kandil The Use of Computational Methods for Automated Content Analyses in Online Conspiracy Theory Research regarding COVID Vaccines: A Scoping Review
12:40—13:00 in person Hannes Cools Where exactly between utopia and dystopia? Using topic modelling to analyze how AI and automation is framed in US newspapers
13:00—13:20 in person Olga Logunova and Lebedev Pavel Linguistic Patterns in Celebrity Digital Platforms Strategy: Topic Modelling of Social Media Posts
13:20—14:40 Lunch
Panel 3.2. Computational methods
14:40—15:00 in person Mark Mets and Andres Karjus Feasibility of automated political stance classification in written media
15:00—15:20 in person Sebastian Kurten and Omnia Kandil Nature and extent of computational methods in communication sciences research: A computational scoping review
15:20—15:40 in person Yan Asadchy, Andres Karjus and Maximilian Schich Profile pictures worth a thousand words: Machine Learning approach in studying self-representation on dating apps
15:40—16:00 online Javier J. Amores, David Blanco-Herrero, Carlos Arcila-Calderón, Patricia Sánchez-Holgado and Maximiliano Frías-Vázquez Using computational methods to analyse tweets about COVID-19 during the decline of the first wave of the pandemic
16:00—16:20 Coffee break
Panel 4. Experimental and network methods
16:20—16:40 in person Natalia Umansky Beyond the speech act: a network approach to securitization
16:40—17:00 in person Elena Artemenko, Maksim Terpilovskii, Taisiia Ulianova, Victoria Vziatysheva, Olessia Koltsova and Reinhold Kliegl The role of the news source on accuracy of fake news recognition and message credibility: an eye-tracking study
17:00—17:20 online Rod Abhari, Stefanie Demetriades, Agnes Horvat and Nathan Walter Measuring Media Polarization with Communication Ecologies
17:20—17:40 in person Reinhold Kliegl, Alexander Porshnev and Maxim Terpilovskii No wasted data in online research: fakenews online experiment case.
17:40—18:00 Break
18:00—19:00 in person
KEYNOTE Vladimir Kovalenko
Analysis of Communication and Collaborative Work in Software Engineering
JUNE, 29
Panel 5. Media audience and information consumtion
10:00—10:20 in person Reinhold Kliegl Discriminability and Confirmation Bias in Fake-News Web Experiments: A Mixed-Model Based Signal-Detection Approach
10:20—10:40 in person Victoria Vziatysheva, Maxim Terpilovskii and Reinhold Kliegl The more media literate, the less biased? An experiment on the role of confirmation bias and media professionalism in fake news perception
10:40—11:00 in person Sergei Pashakhin Public agenda fragmentation beyond established democracies: the case of Russian online publics in 2017
11:00—11:20 online Hamid Keshavarz, Mohammadreza Esmaeili Givi and Nasim Khodashenas Social media communication and health literacy and information behavior: impacts and relationships
11:20—11:40 Coffee break
Panel 6. Media coverage
11:40—12:00 in person Vejune Zemaityte, Mila Oiva, Ksenia Mukhina, Andres Karjus and Maximilian Schich Tracing gender diversity in labour networks of Soviet newsreel production 1945-92
12:00—12:20 in person Mikhail Tamm, Mila Oiva, Ksenia Mukhina, Mark Mets and Maximilian Schich World map through the lens of Soviet propaganda: geography of Soviet Newsreel “Daily News”, 1945-1992
12:20—12:40 online Milos Moskovljevic I-Wars and Ajvar Affairs: Fight for Balkan Cultural Heritage and Construction of National Identites through Digital Memetic Space
12:40—13:00 online Xenia Leontyeva Gender (im)balance in Russian cinema
13:00—13:20 online Elizabeth Thompson Emerging themes in climate science collaboration: An exploratory analysis of GitHub repositories
13:20—14:40 Lunch
Panel 7. Social interactions in digital space
14:40—15:00 in person Larisa Mararitsa, Olessia Koltsova, Maxim Terpilowski, Yadviga Sinyawskaya and Sergey Pashakhin In-depth examination of online friendship on subjective and objective data from representative SNS
15:00—15:20 in person Olessia Koltsova, Yadviga Sinyavskaya, Alexander Porshnev and Reinhold Kliegl Structural vs perceived social capital online: effects of privacy behaviors and attitudes
15:20—15:40 in person Yuying Tan, Karolien Poels, Sara Pabian and Heidi Vandebosch Talking about sexual harassment and receiving support in Reddit communities
15:40—16:00 in person Larisa Mararitsa and Melnikova Maria Personality and social signature in direct communication on Vkontakte
16:00—16:30 Coffee break
16:30—17:30 online
KEYNOTE Rich Ling
The Social and Psychological Dimensions of Confirmation Bias
17:30—18:00 Closing remarks
Time (GMT+3) Authors, title, format
JUNE, 27
10:00 - 10:30 Opening remarks
10:30 - 11:30 KEYNOTE
Markus Strohmaier
Inequalities in Social Networks
(online)
Panel 1.1. Political communication online
11:30 - 11:50 Svetlana Bodrunova
Patterns of cumulative deliberation in online discussions
(in person)
11:50 - 12:10 Aidar Zinnatullin
Online political discussions within oppositional communities on YouTube in the non-democratic context
(in person)
12:10 - 12:30 Anna Shilina and Denis Stukal
Trolls in Online Political Communication in Social Media: Roles and Perception
(online)
12:30 - 12:50 Ernesto de León, Mykola Makhortykh, Aleksandra Urman and Roberto Ulloa
Googling the ‘Big Lie’: How search engine algorithms determined exposure of the US 2020 presidential conspiracy
(online)
12:50 - 14:00 Lunch
Panel 2.2. Political communication online
14:00 - 14:20 Kinga Adamczewsaka
The role of media in political information flow
(online)
14:20 - 14:40 Patricia Sánchez-Holgado, David Blanco-Herrero, Javier J. Amores, Cristina Quintana and Carlos Arcila-Calderón
Hate Speech as a Predictor of Social Acceptance of Migrants in Europe. Computational and Large-scale Analysis of Geolocated Hateful Tweets
(online)
14:40 - 15:00 Ilya Philippov
Symmetrical Answer: Police Suppression of Protest Episodes as a Driver of Political Communication in Social Media
(online)
15:00 - 15:20 Break
Panel 2.1. Media response to the COVID-19 pandemic
15:20 - 15:40 Daniel Thiele
“Don’t believe the media’s pandemic propaganda!!” How Covid-19 affected populist Facebook user comments in seven European countries
(in person)
15:40 - 16:00 Lambodara Parabhoi, Ajit Kumar Kainchi and Dr Manoj Kumar Verma
Sentiment Analysis Covishield, Covaxin and SputnikV Vaccines Use in India
(in person)
16:00 - 16:20 Dechun Zhang, Chang Zhang and Hsuan Lei Shao
Affective biopolitics in the time of crisis: Unpacking Chinese Party press’s soft propaganda during Covid-19
(in person)
16:20 - 16:40 Siqi Li
Research on the Media Consumption of Chinese-People in the UK in the Current Global Media Context
(in person)
16:50 - 17:00 Coffee break
Panel 2.2. Media response to the COVID-19 pandemic
17:00 - 17:20 Alexandra Bocharova
Information Policy of Chinese Media during Political and COVID-related Crises: Comparative Analysis
(online)
17:20 - 17:40 Lāsma Šķestere and Roberts Dargis
The chicken or the egg causality dilemma: who leads the spread of information about COVID-19?
(online)
17:40 - 18:00 Anqi Shao, Kaiping Chen, Zening Duan and Sijia Yang
The Reproductive Dynamics of Moral Appeal Expression on Social Media – Examining Public Discourse of COVID-19 Issues on Twitter
(online)
18:00 - 18:20 Olga Kamenchuk, Ayse Lokmanoglu and Erik Nisbet
Social Amplification of COVID-19 Risk in Russian Social Mediated News 2020-2021
(online)
18:20 - 18:30 Break
18:30 - 19:30 KEYNOTE
Anabel Quan-Haase
Ethics and Privacy in Computational Social Science: Data access, representativity, and consent
(in person)
JUNE, 28
10:00 - 11:00 KEYNOTE
Wouter van Atteveldt
Media effects research in an age of fragmentation and social media
(online)
Panel 2.3. Media response to the COVID-19 pandemic
11:00 - 11:20 Dmitry Erokhin and Nadejda Komendantova
COVID-19 pandemic and conspiracy theories
(online)
11:20 - 11:40 Jae Eun Chung, Jiang Li, Ikechukwu Anude, Poong Oh and Liu Meirong
Understanding public perception and attitudes toward Covid-19 vaccination: Computational Approach through Twitter
(online)
11:40 - 12:00 Elizaveta Kuznetsova, Mykola Makhortykh, Aleksandra Urman and Roberto Ulloa
Why not just give it a shot? How the Russian COVID-19 vaccines are framed by web search engines
(online)
12:00 - 12:20 Coffee break
Panel 3.1. Computational methods
12:20 - 12:40 Tim Robin Strate and Omnia Kandil
The Use of Computational Methods for Automated Content Analyses in Online Conspiracy Theory Research regarding COVID Vaccines: A Scoping Review
(in person)
12:40 - 13:00 Hannes Cools
Where exactly between utopia and dystopia? Using topic modelling to analyze how AI and automation is framed in US newspapers
(in person)
13:00 - 13:20 Olga Logunova and Lebedev Pavel
Linguistic Patterns in Celebrity Digital Platforms Strategy: Topic Modelling of Social Media Posts
(in person)
13:20 - 14:40 Lunch
Panel 3.2. Computational methods
14:40 - 15:00 Mark Mets and Andres Karjus
Feasibility of automated political stance classification in written media
(in person)
15:00 - 15:20 Sebastian Kurten and Omnia Kandil
Nature and extent of computational methods in communication sciences research: A computational scoping review
(in person)
15:20 - 15:40 Yan Asadchy, Andres Karjus and Maximilian Schich
Profile pictures worth a thousand words: Machine Learning approach in studying self-representation on dating apps
(in person)
15:40 - 16:00 Javier J. Amores, David Blanco-Herrero, Carlos Arcila-Calderón, Patricia Sánchez-Holgado and Maximiliano Frías-Vázquez
Using computational methods to analyse tweets about COVID-19 during the decline of the first wave of the pandemic
(online)
16:00 - 16:20 Coffee break
Panel 4. Experimental and network methods
16:20 - 16:40 Natalia Umansky
Beyond the speech act: a network approach to securitization
(in person)
16:40 - 17:00 Elena Artemenko, Maksim Terpilovskii, Taisiia Ulianova, Victoria Vziatysheva, Olessia Koltsova and Reinhold Kliegl
The role of the news source on accuracy of fake news recognition and message credibility: an eye-tracking study
(in person)
17:00 - 17:20 Rod Abhari, Stefanie Demetriades, Agnes Horvat and Nathan Walter
Measuring Media Polarization with Communication Ecologies
(online)
17:20 - 17:40 Reinhold Kliegl, Alexander Porshnev and Maxim Terpilovskii
No wasted data in online research: fakenews online experiment case
(in person)
17:40 - 18:00 Break
18:00 - 19:00 KEYNOTE
Vladimir Kovalenko
Analysis of Communication and Collaborative Work in Software Engineering
(in person)
JUNE, 29
Panel 5. Media audience and information consumtion
10:00 - 10:20 Reinhold Kliegl
Discriminability and Confirmation Bias in Fake-News Web Experiments: A Mixed-Model Based Signal-Detection Approach
(in person)
10:20 - 10:40 Victoria Vziatysheva, Maxim Terpilovskii and Reinhold Kliegl
The more media literate, the less biased? An experiment on the role of confirmation bias and media professionalism in fake news perception
(in person)
10:40 - 11:00 Sergei Pashakhin
Public agenda fragmentation beyond established democracies: the case of Russian online publics in 2017
(in person)
11:00 - 11:20 Hamid Keshavarz, Mohammadreza Esmaeili Givi and Nasim Khodashenas
Social media communication and health literacy and information behavior: impacts and relationships
(online)
11:20 - 11:40 Coffee break
Panel 6. Media coverage
11:40 - 12:00 Vejune Zemaityte, Mila Oiva, Ksenia Mukhina, Andres Karjus and Maximilian Schich
Tracing gender diversity in labour networks of Soviet newsreel production 1945-92
(in person)
12:00 - 12:20 Mikhail Tamm, Mila Oiva, Ksenia Mukhina, Mark Mets and Maximilian Schich
World map through the lens of Soviet propaganda: geography of Soviet Newsreel “Daily News”, 1945-1992
(in person)
12:20 - 12:40 Milos Moskovljevic
I-Wars and Ajvar Affairs: Fight for Balkan Cultural Heritage and Construction of National Identites through Digital Memetic Space
(online)
12:40 - 13:00 Xenia Leontyeva
Gender (im)balance in Russian cinema
(online)
13:00 - 13:20 Elizabeth Thompson
Emerging themes in climate science collaboration: An exploratory analysis of GitHub repositories
(online)
13:20 - 14:40 Lunch
Panel 7. Social interactions in digital space
14:40 - 15:00 Larisa Mararitsa, Olessia Koltsova, Maxim Terpilowski, Yadviga Sinyawskaya and Sergey Pashakhin
In-depth examination of online friendship on subjective and objective data from representative SNS
(in person)
15:00 - 15:20 Olessia Koltsova, Yadviga Sinyavskaya and Alexander Porshnev
Structural vs perceived social capital online: effects of privacy behaviors and attitudes
(in person)
15:20 - 15:40 Yuying Tan, Karolien Poels, Sara Pabian and Heidi Vandebosch
Talking about sexual harassment and receiving support in Reddit communities
(in person)
15:40 - 16:00 Larisa Mararitsa and Melnikova Maria
Personality and social signature in direct communication on Vkontakte
(in person)
16:00 - 16:30 Coffee break
16:30 - 17:30 KEYNOTE
Rich Ling
The Social and Psychological Dimensions of Confirmation Bias
(online)
17:30 - 18:00 Closing remarks

Travel

City

Helsinki is the Capital of Finland and home to about 1.5 million inhabitants. Founded in 1550 by King Gustav Vasa from Sweden, this city has been the meeting point between Eastern and Western European traditions for centuries. Currently, Helsinki is considered one of the world's most livable cities. The Helsinki region includes the capital city, metropolitan area, and further- flung towns and cities. Here, nature trails and city life coexist. Also, across the city you will find your self overflowing with great restaurants, cute design shops, amazing museums, and unique architecture.

Click here for more information about what to do during your stay in Helsinki.

Passport
Visas

You will not need a travel visa for entering Finland if you are a citizen of a Nordic country or a national of an EU Member State. In addition, you do not require a visa if you are a citizen of a visa-free country and have a valid passport or an equivalent travel document.

Please visit the website of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Finland to check your specific entry requirements.

Due to the Covid 19 Pandemic, there are additional special entry requirements for entering Finland. We encourage you to visit the official website of the Government of Finland for more information about specific Covid-19 related travel requirements.

Venue

University of Helsinki
University

CompCom 2022 will be held at the University of Helsinki, Finland's oldest, largest, and best- ranked research university. Currently, the University of Helsinki comprises more than 40,000 students and researchers on four campuses. Since 1640, this University has contributed to establishing a fair and equal society that is considered by many the happiest in the world.

The University of Helsinki is internationally recognized for its high-quality teaching, research, and innovation. As one of the world's top 1% research universities, it believes that the power of thought can change attitudes, people, and society. The University of Helsinki ranks in the 50-100 range in all international university rankings. On average, it places among the top 30 European universities and the top 4 of the Nordic universities. Besides, the University's 11 faculties are home to many departments and accommodate several independent research-oriented institutes and multidisciplinary research networks.

Campus

Our meetings will take place in the City Centre Campus, situated n the heart of Helsinki. This multidisciplinary campus is the largest of the University of Helsinki, with approximately 17 000 students. The City Centre Campus is formed by the Faculty of Behavioural Sciences, the Faculty of Arts, the Faculty of Theology, the Faculty of Law, the Faculty of Social Sciences, and the Swedish School of Social Science. The campus also has several independent institutes in various fields ranging from the humanities and social sciences to the natural sciences.

Because of its great location, this campus offers a broad range of services and famous attractions within proximity. Additionally, the City Centre Campus is home to Think Corner, an open forum and coworking center, a forum for science and research, the Museum of Natural History, the exhibition of Helsinki University Museum on the third floor of the University's Main Building, the Helsinki Observatory on Tähtitorninmäki Hill as well as the Botanic Garden in Kaisaniemi.

City Centre Campus in Helsinki

City Centre Campus in Helsinki, Finland

We remind you that the City Centre Campus is spread along a large area of the center of Helsinki. Most university buildings are near Fabianinkatu and Unioninkatu, but some are farther. So, be sure to check your building's address before visiting.

University facilities for offline and online conferencing

The University of Helsinki offers a variety of venues and services for online and offline events. For offline events, the University has several facilities on four campuses in Helsinki, ranging from teamwork spaces to a 700-person auditorium. In particular, the city center campus includes multiple buildings with lecture halls that were already in use in the 19th Century. You can find more information about all services and facilities available on the website of the University of Helsinki.

Providing an accessible environment where everyone can engage equally irrespective of their characteristics related to sight, hearing, movement, age, or learning difficulties is of utmost importance for CompCom. Furthermore, the University of Helsinki is committed to providing a suitable environment for all, regardless of their ability to move and function. So, please get in touch with us at ica2022compcomm@gmail.com if you require any special needs related to accessibility to make sure your needs are considered during our event.

Contacts

Host

The conference is hosted by Darja Gritsenko in her capacity of Assistant Professor at Aleksanteri Institute — Finnish Centre for Russian and East European Studies, university of Helsinki. The initiator of the conference — SCILa, the Social & Cognitive Informatics Lab of HSE university, Russia — has completely stepped down as the conference’s institutional host. Its members are helping with the conference organization as individual scholars. This work of theirs is not funded either by HSE or by the university of Helsinki.

Contact us

For any information related to the conference, contact us at ica2022compcomm@gmail.com .